Sunday, October 19, 2008

Okay, on to Saturday!

We had breakfast at the Cracker Barrel and I did NOT buy any of the cool stuff that is offered there (but maybe we can go BACK someday?).


Then we went to the Patee House. This hotel was built in 1858 and was the Pony Express headquarters. Also, when Jesse James was killed, his family stayed at the hotel for a few days while trying to figure out what to do and where to go. It’s a lovely museum, with ramps and wide enough “walk-ways” so that I could take the pony in.

Right next to the Patee House (well, actually right behind) was the house that Jesse James was killed in. They moved it from the site a few miles away and set it up for a museum. Jesse James was (and is) considered a folk hero but he killed about seventeen people as well as robbed banks and trains, so to most he is just a criminal that deserved to be killed, even if it was a friend that was staying at his home.

My mother and father have a friend that is a direct descendant of both Jesse and brother Frank. Her parents or grandparents were cousins, one from each side of the family. To her, Jesse and Frank were heroes and an American Robin Hood.

I did not get any pictures from the Jesse James house - my batteries died; I am hoping that Charles got some good ones and will send them to me.

After that (where Peanut had to stay in the car), we went down to the Pony Express museum. It was only a few blocks, so nephew CJ and I walked (he walked, I rode the pony and Peanut rode with me while Norm and Charles drove the cars over. Then Peanut went back to the van while we went into the museum. It was a wonderful museum of a great time in history. Did you know that the Pony Express lasted only about eighteen months? The first run was begun on April 3, 1860 at St. Joseph and took only ten days, seven hours, and forty-five minutes to reach Sacramento, California. The last run finished on October 26, 1861. One of the biggest reasons for the shortness of the Pony Express runs was the telegraph. You could get news in minutes rather than days. Another company got the mail contract and sent mail over stage rather than by pony.

We had a late lunch and then headed back to the motel for a rest. Norm wanted to see the Stetson Hat factory outlet store, but it closed before we found it.

For supper, we went to a lovely small restaurant that seemed to be very popular. The food was excellent!

CJ worked on my computer (it always needs SOMETHING done to it) and we visited some more. We then said goodbye to Charles and CJ, who were leaving early in the morning to head back to Oklahoma.

Sunday (yesterday) was also a busy day, but I’ll write about that tomorrow. It was a beautiful weekend. Today was a beautiful day – you have a beautiful day.

Pictures from the Patee House

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This is a picture that is set in, deep, with a lovely frame around it



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Jody, these are salt cellars

Photobucket A fancy salt cellar and spoons

Photobucket I WANT one!
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At the Pony Express Museum
Photobucket Ready for the first ride

Photobucket The museum is housed in the original stables

Photobucket Legal stamp

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Looking at the routes
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Riding a pony!
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The original well, dug inside the stables, was unearthed and cleaned out - is working (but non-drinkable)
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Lovely bronzes all over!
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Side of the stables

1 comment:

City Mouse said...

WOW! What a terrific post! I have a thing for the Pony Express and the old stage routes (and trains too), so this was really interesting for me. I also have a thing for old wells, LOL. Thanks for all the pics!