Wednesday, March 05, 2008

A fun time

We got home on Monday night after a brief but great time with the family. We arrived there about noon on Sunday and left about three on Monday. Too short, but we had to get things done at home.

Not much was done except go out for supper at Old Country Buffet, Norm’s favorite place to go; other than that, we just “hung out,” playing card games and cuddling and visiting. Bubba decorated a cake for her Grandpa that was really very pretty.


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Home to about seven eggs in the nest – these gals are NOT laying very well this winter – too cold for them!!

Jody stopped by on her way back to the cities – she ended up staying down her at her farm for about ten days – a record stay for her! She stopped to drop off the heating pad she had borrowed for Arthur Godfrey. She said he is growing, still, and doing well, even though his leg is still not working.

I “wrote” a poem for her the other day – silly, but she loves it!

Jody had a little lamb
His fleece was brown and splotchy.
Every where that Jody went
There followed Arthur Godfrey.

We have snow and cold, again. Blizzarding conditions, so neither Candy nor I are going to head out to exercise. I think I’ll exercise on my mini-trampoline this morning. It is supposed to be cold and miserable for the rest of the week.

We are in the process of trying to decide what to do for heat! At the moment, corn has gone up to about five dollars a bushel, which makes it more expensive than propane. We have purchased some wood pellets to supplement the corn, as it is about half the cost of the corn. But what are we going to do in the future? Candy and Wayne are deliberating, as well. Wood is cheaper, but purchasing an outdoor furnace is pretty expensive (the way we all think we’d like to go if we go to wood). And then there is the sad-but-true fact that all of us are getting older (and wiser) and realize that it won’t be too long in the future that either boy will be physically able to cut the wood. And both places will run out of wood fairly soon if we depend on our wood for heat so would have to go else where to cut or purchase it. What to do? What to do?

Now, back in South Dakota, the house that Candy and Wayne lived in did not have central heat, so they opted for “cove” heating. This is all electric heat that has a radiant bar on the ceiling of every room you want to heat; each heater had it’s own thermostat so you can have every room a different temperature. This is what they think they may go to, and we might, as well. It is worry free, no work for people growing older and and it is warm.

We (the four of us) have discussed the possibility of windmills, but have discovered that any windmill that would work for the whole house would be so expensive that we’d never get our money back in our lifetimes. Now, the idea of being “off grid” or independent in this day and age is a wonderful idea, but is totally unfeasible for most people (including us). If you have wood, you usually need electricity to push the heat around. If you have corn or wood pellets, again, the electricity to push the heat. Propane? The same – I have not found any heat source that does not use electricity to push the heat around the house. Right now, electricity is cheaper than propane (or natural gas, if you live in town). If we chose to go totally electric, then we can reserve the propane for times that the electricity is more than propane.

So, that’s what’s going on in our minds. There seems to be no option that we can think of to have cheap heat and power. And going “green” doesn’t seem to be much of an option. Not unless we move to an island in the South Pacific and life off fish and live in a hut! And I think we are too old to do even that!

We are starting to pack up for New Ulm. This is the winter Trade Fair that is so much fun; it starts Saturday, so we need to be there on Friday to set up. Unfortunately we cannot take Peanut, so Candy is going to take care of her while we are gone. Perhaps someday I can convince the people who run the Hall to allow me to bring her. If you are in the area, it’s Turner Hall in New Ulm, Minnesota – there are Rendezvous-ers that are selling their wares. And there are demonstrators, as well.

So, that’s all the news from Ash Lane Farm as of today – it’s a beautiful day, inside. It looks pretty outside, even though it’s cold and blustery. You have a beautiful day!

3 comments:

Kati said...

I'm sorry y'all are facing such struggles with keeping warm. My dad's recently started commenting on how he thinks a lot of people are going to be hurting to leave Alaska, in the near future, because it's quickly becoming impossible to keep warm, with the price of fuel rising to the point where a lot of us can't really afford it, and yet we can't afford NOT to have it, either.

Best of luck finding a workable option for your situation!!!!

The rhyme for your friend's little lamb is hilarious!!!! You're creative in more ways than one, Connie. *grin*

Hope spring arrives soon, in your area!

Manerva said...

Sounds like you had a wonderful time. I love the poem--it is just too cute!

We are in your shoes on the heat issue as well...I myself would opt for the wood stove and maybe hire a good looking lad to cut and stack the wood for some eye candy as well...In my dreams anyhow!

jayedee said...

you poem is great! thanks for the early morning smile!

so many folks are in the same quandry about how to keep warm in the winter/cool in the summer. there just doesn't seem to be any relief in sight, does there?

we're in central florida so there is no need for heat here.....however, the temperatures are brutal in the summer and folks regularly fall out from the heat and humidity. one extreme to the other, eh?